Photography, it’s my way of life.

Photography is not simply what I like to do, its baked into my DNA.

Take a look at my cameras and it is clear – I use them.  I use them a lot. They show it, and have scars aplenty, the finishes are worn. They are not the latest and greatest. I know them well enough to be able to operate them in the dark.

For the most part, I like to point them at places and things.  People can turn into pains-in-the-asses when you point a camera at them, so I stick with inanimate objects and scary places when i can.
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I’ve been published a bunch and use my camera to transport me to abandoned places as well as fun places where my focus is on two-wheels. I see the world much as a camera, composition is always right there, top of mind, as is light.

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My knowledge of photography is gained through a lifetime of experience – a lot of trial and error. I’m a traditionalist in the regard that I  do all of my work “in-camera” and do not Photoshop my work. I practice a lot.

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I’ve been holding a camera since I was 14 years old. But I was studying photography way before that, probably since I grabbed my first magazine or Sunday New York Times magazine section.

To this day, I am still inspired by LOOK, LIFE, National Geographic and war coverage/ photography of the Vietnam-era. I really became a photographer in college, as my view began to mature.

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Due to the proliferation of technology we all carry cameras. With the flood of imagery that is available and broadcast by the minute, it becomes evermore clear – who is a purposeful photographer and who is snapping pictures (not that there is anything wrong with snapping pictures).

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But there is a difference, look for it, please.